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Does sleep affect child obesity?

Suzanna Martinez will study how sleep duration affects the diet and physical activity of Mexican-American children.
September is Childhood Obesity Awareness Month and Hispanic Heritage Month kicked off on Sept. 15. A new Nutrition Policy Institute study on obesity among Mexican-American children ties in with both of these themes.

One in five Mexican-American children is obese, according to national statistics. While scientists agree that diet and exercise play a role in obesity, studies also suggest that children who don't get enough sleep may also be at increased risk for obesity. Does this mean that children who don't get enough sleep are more likely to become obese due to poor eating habits and being less physically active?

The National Institutes of Health has awarded $895,620 to Suzanna Martinez, Ph.D., assistant researcher for UC Nutrition Policy Institute (NPI) in the UC Division of Agriculture and Natural Resources, to try to answer that question. This will be the first pediatric study to examine health behaviors that link sleep to obesity in Mexican-American children.

Studies have shown that adults who are short on sleep may experience a change in metabolism and hormones, causing the person to eat more and to be more sedentary the following day.

To explore how sleep affects child obesity, Martinez will examine social and cultural factors that may impact Mexican-American children's sleep and, in turn, how sleep affects their diet and physical activity.

Inadequate sleep may affect a child's appetite.
Martinez hopes to provide guidance for which behaviors to target to prevent obesity.

“Some researchers just focus on diet, some researchers just focus on physical activity, while other researchers say it's all about the environment so we have to improve the environment in terms of food environment and opportunities to be active,” Martinez said. “There's very little research that tries to target all three aspects of health behavior – sleep, diet and physical activity – because there are so many factors to consider. We have to know which will make the biggest impact on obesity prevention. Is it sleep, diet or physical activity or a combination of all three?” Currently, programs are heavily focused on diet and/or physical activity.

Social and cultural factors may affect sleep

Martinez is essentially combining three different studies into one to evaluate the context of sleep and how it impacts obesity. The five-year study will occur in two phases.

She'll begin by looking at the culture, environment and socioeconomic status of the Mexican American families to see which factors may relate to sleep duration.

For example, Martinez said, “If less acculturated Mexican-American parents have stricter or earlier bedtimes for their children, is that protective for getting optimal sleep, less protective or does it even matter?”

Living in crowded housing or in neighborhoods with high crime, homelessness and drugs can impact sleep for urban Latino families, Martinez learned from interviews with Latino parents for a study she published in 2015

Sleep and physical activity and diet

The second phase of the study will involve evaluating the sleep duration of 40 Mexican American kids, ages 8 to 10, in the San Francisco Bay Area over two summers.

To record their sleep and physical activity, the participating kids will wear accelerometers during the day and while they sleep. The small, pedometer-like devices are worn on a belt around the hip.

For the first week of the three-week study, the children will be asked to get their normal sleep. During the second week, half of the children will be asked to sleep for less than 8 hours and the other half will be asked to sleep at least 10 hours. The third week, the two groups will switch over to the other sleep schedule.

Their diets will be measured using 24-hour dietary recalls. On Friday and Saturday, children will be asked what he or she ate the day before (Thursday and Friday). Starting with breakfast, the children will report what they ate and drank for meals and any snacks.

Martinez will evaluate whether healthy sleep or restricted sleep the previous night impacts the children's diet and physical activity the next day.

“With the crossover study, we will be able to see how kids compare when they get their usual sleep, healthy sleep or not  enough sleep  and how that impacts how much they eat and how much they move the next day,” she said.

Current child-obesity prevention programs are heavily focused on diet and physical activity.

No U.S. sleep guidelines

To maintain a healthy weight, U.S. Office of Disease Prevention and Health Promotion recommends that children get at least 30 minutes of physical activity daily and the Dietary Guidelines for America recommend that children eat a nutrient-dense and calorically balanced diet. The government office currently has no national sleep guidelines for Americans.

In a 2014 study, Martinez found that 82 percent of Mexican-American children ages 8 to 10 obtained less than the 10 to 11 hours of sleep the National Sleep Foundation recommended before 2015. Under the network of sleep researchers' new sleep recommendation of 9 to 11 hours for this age group, 20 percent of children received less than adequate sleep.

“There needs to be more research on sleep duration before we can say, ‘Sleeping this amount of time will help prevent obesity,'” Martinez said.

If her hunch is correct, promoting optimal sleep (at least 10 hours for school-age children) may be an effective way to reduce childhood obesity, and understanding the role of culture in obesity among Mexican-American children who have some of the highest rates obesity will be a key to designing effective solutions.

Research has shown that obesity contributes to numerous lifelong health problems, including heart disease, stroke, diabetes and high blood pressure. One in four overweight children become obese as an adult, and diseases like diabetes are presenting earlier than adulthood. National data show that 14 percent of white children are classified as obese, while 21 percent of Latino children are obese. With Latino children at increased risk, Martinez is committed to finding the causes of this disparity and to develop effective ways to reduce obesity among Mexican-American children.

This child obesity study is funded by a K01 Career Development Award from the National Institutes of Health National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute. Martinez has also been accepted into the K Scholars Program at UC San Francisco, which will provide her with peer support and mentorship to conduct the study.

Posted on Tuesday, September 20, 2016 at 11:56 AM

Biodigesters turn food into electricity, but can they also create fertilizer?

On a recent late-summer Wednesday, a freight container filled with cases of expired Muscle Milk protein drink awaited unloading at the UC Davis Renewable Energy Anaerobic Digester (READ) while a front-loader scooped heaps of spoiled vegetables into a mechanical processor. Nourished by a diet of assorted food waste from the UC Davis campus and area restaurants and markets, READ harnesses the activity of billions of microbes to produce biogas capable of generating 5.6 million kWh per year of clean electricity for UC Davis.

Out of date products are sent to the aenorobic biodigester to be converted to energy and now fertilizer

But a by-product of READ and other anaerobic digesters – the slurry of leftover solid and liquid material, or digestate – has caught the attention of UC Davis researchers interested in “closing the loop” on food production, consumption, and waste. When processed through an anaerobic digester, organic materials like food discards, expired or off-spec food products, or animal manure can be transformed into concentrated biofertilizers and soil amendments that are highly effective and easily applied to crops.

In an interdisciplinary collaboration at the Russell Ranch Sustainable Agriculture Facility, funded by the California State Water Resources Control Board and the California Department of Food and Agriculture, UC Davis faculty and students have developed a pilot-scale process for commercial production of several forms of this biofertilizer using digestate from READ and other nearby digesters. They are also evaluating their effects on yield and other agronomic metrics in corn and tomato field trials – paving the way for farmers and growers to take advantage of a highly sustainable source of plant nutrition.

The challenge and opportunity of fertilizer from anaerobic biodigesters

The digestate from READ and other digester facilities can be applied directly to soil as a fertilizer, but, because it has a limited shelf-life, it usually must be applied to land in the immediate region of the facility. With the input of food waste that can vary widely from day to day, a facility's digestate is inconsistent in texture and composition, making it difficult to transport and apply to fields using common farm fertilizer equipment.

Filtering and drying this digestate, however, results in solid and liquid forms that can be concentrated, homogenized, easily transported, and applied to soil through existing drip irrigation systems or surface spreading equipment.

This process could allow farmers and growers located further away, and working with common irrigation and fertilizer application equipment, to supplement or replace their synthetic fertilizer consumption with biofertilizers from food waste or animal manure.

How do biodigestate products measure up to synthetic fertilizers?

The research, co-led by professor Ruihong Zhang from the UC Davis Department of Biological and Agricultural Engineering (who also designed READ in partnership with Sacramento-based tech company CleanWorld) and Professor Kate Scow from the Department of Land, Air, and Water Resources, developed pilot-scale systems to efficiently and consistently separate the solid and liquid portions of food- and manure-based digestates. The researchers then examined the nutrient composition of the solid and liquid biofertilizer products, finding that biodigestate-based fertilizers contain valuable nutrients and microbes not found in many synthetic fertilizers.

In current field trials, the researchers are investigating the effects of each of the biofertilizer products on crop yield and quality. Their preliminary results show that it is possible to grow irrigated processing tomatoes and short-season corn using biofertilizer products as the sole source of fertilizer. The origin of the fertilizer matters, however – manure-based liquid fertilizer formed additional large particles after the final filtration, creating concerns about clogging the drip irrigation system. The team thinks an environmentally benign chemical sometimes added to manure digesters to clean the biogas may be the culprit of the problem, but future research is needed. The solid biofertilizer pellets they developed show much promise, as they can be applied using existing methods for spreading compost and can be economically transported farther away from the digester.

In addition to better understanding the best processes for producing and using the biofertilizers, further research is needed to understand how much of the nitrogen in each of the fertilizer products is available for uptake by the crop, as well as economic analyses to determine the commercial-scale production and transportation costs. The researchers will be able to narrow in on the agronomic and economic potential of biofertilizers through the upcoming analysis of the yield of the corn and tomato experiment plots at Russell Ranch. The results of a tomato experiment recently showed that the digestate fertilizers produced just as much fruit as a popular synthetic fertilizer.

UC Cooperative Extension advisor Gene Miyao looks at biofertilizer in its various stages, from raw waste to fertilizer

Interdisciplinary research for agricultural innovations

Russell Ranch, a program of the Agricultural Sustainability Institute, is designed as a shared space for interdisciplinary research and innovation. The biofertilizer research, among other active projects at Russell Ranch, is an example of the fulfillment of that intention. “The soil scientists are learning engineering, the engineers are learning biology, and the biologists are learning about soil,” Professor Zhang remarked.

The exchange also extends beyond the university: a recent UC Davis Biofertilizer Field Day drew attendees from the UC Division of Agriculture and Natural Resources, several public agencies, the agricultural sector, other universities, nonprofits, entrepreneurs, and food processors. If the research continues to illuminate a way forward for biofertilizers, these audiences may fill important roles in bringing this new technology into practice – and in recycling your lunch leftovers back into a more efficient and sustainable food system.

More information: UC Davis READ, Russell Ranch, and the biofertilizer research

The UC Davis Renewable Energy Anaerobic Digester was unveiled in 2014 as the nation's largest anaerobic biodigester on a college campus, and represented a unique private-public partnership. Professor Ruihong Zhang invented the anaerobic digestion technology used by CleanWorld, which developed it into one of the most advanced commercially-available digester systems in the country.

Russell Ranch Sustainable Agriculture Facility is a “living laboratory” for interdisciplinary field research and innovation. Its flagship project, the Century Experiment, measures the long-term impacts of energy, water, carbon, and nitrogen inputs on agricultural sustainability in the flagship Century Experiment.

The biofertilizer research collaboration includes Zhang Lab graduate students Tyler Barzee and Hossein Edalati, Scow Lab postdoctoral researcher Daoyuan Wang, and Russell Ranch manager Israel Herrera. Collaborating institutions include CleanWorld, California Bioenergy, New Hope Dairy (Galt, CA), Fiscalini Dairy (Modesto, CA), and Sacramento Municipal Utility District.

Posted on Thursday, September 15, 2016 at 8:30 AM

Tips for a successful fall vegetable garden

When planning a fall garden it is important to take into consideration the first frost dates in your area to protect your crop. (Photo: Melissa Womack)
For many gardeners' spring and summer months are synonymous with growing edible gardens, but home vegetable gardening doesn't have to end when cool fall temperatures arrive. This fall, take advantage of California's unique climate that makes it possible to grow a variety of crops throughout the year.

Warm vs. cool season crops

Most vegetables are classified as either a warm season or cool season crop. This designation is based on the temperature range that the plants thrive in. Warm season crops grow best when the days are long and the temperatures are high (between 65°-95°F). In contrast, cool season crops grow and produce the best quality produce when the average temperatures are between 55°-75°F and are typically tolerant of light frosts when mature.

Typical cool season crops include root vegetables such as: beets, carrots, parsnips, and radishes; stems such as asparagus and rhubarb; leafy crops like cabbage, celery, lettuce, spinach and crops that have edible immature flowers like artichokes, cauliflower, and broccoli.

Importance of frost dates

Scarecrows are a staple decoration in autumn but they also serve a purpose in the garden of scaring off unwanted birds and animals. (Photo: Melissa Womack)
According to the UC Master Gardener Program's gardening resource the California Garden Web it is important to keep in mind the first and last frost dates in your area and protect plants if frost is expected, unless the crop is frost tolerant and established enough to handle the weather.

“When deciding what to plant in your edible garden it is important to take into consideration the best months a crop will thrive,” says Missy Gable, statewide director for the UC Master Gardener Program. “Fall can be a very rewarding gardening season. There are a variety of delicious crops that can survive the cooler temps and have a short number of days to maturity.”

Guides for determining the first and last frost dates for a specific area or region are available using historical references from the National Weather Service. Visit the California Garden Web section When should plant my garden? Frost dates webpage for detailed information about when to safely plant frost-tender crops.

Cool season vegetable gardening at a glance: 

Learn more with the UC Master Gardener Program

Artichokes are a beautiful addition to the fall edible garden. For optimal flavor and tenderness artichokes should be harvested before leaves open. Pictured above is the striking purple bloom of an unharvested artichoke. (Photo: Melissa Womack)
Interested in learning more about how to grow a thriving edible garden or home landscape? The UC Master Gardener Program has University-trained volunteers who are eager to help. Volunteers are available to answer questions about preparing your soil, fertilizing, mulching and more. With local programs based in more than 50 counties across California there is sure to be a workshop or class near you. Visit our website to find your local UC Master Gardener Program,




Vegetable Gardening Basics,
California Gardening Web,
California Master Gardener Handbook, Home Vegetable Gardening, page 338-339,
University of California Cooperative Extension Vegetable Research & Information Center,

Posted on Tuesday, September 13, 2016 at 8:49 AM

More irrigation for climate-smart farming and food security in Guatemala

Connecting 9,000 rural households in Guatemala with improved water management and climate-smart agriculture strategies is the goal of a new project led by a team at UC Davis, to ultimately increase food security and reduce poverty in Guatemala's Western Highlands.

Meagan Terry, left, a UC Davis researcher with the Horticulture Innovation Lab in Guatemala, discusses conservation agriculture with a Guatemalan consultant and a local youth group member. (Photo by Beth Mitcham)
Called MásRiego (“more irrigation”), the project aims to increase farmers' incomes and their use of climate-smart strategies, including drip irrigation, rainwater harvesting, reduced tillage, mulch use and diverse crop rotation. To enable farmers to adopt these new practices, the team will not only provide trainings but also build partnerships to increase farmers' access to needed micro-credit financing and irrigation equipment.

“The opportunity to impact so many farmers' lives on this scale is exciting,” said Beth Mitcham, director of the Horticulture Innovation Lab and a UC Cooperative Extension specialist in the UC Davis Department of Plant Sciences. “We're taking lessons learned from our previous research — in Guatemala, Honduras and Cambodia — and building a team to help more small-scale farmers apply our findings and successfully use these innovative practices.”

The new project is part of the U.S. government's global hunger and food security initiative, Feed the Future. The project represents an additional $3.4 million investment in the UC Davis-led Horticulture Innovation Lab by the U.S. Agency for International Development's mission in Guatemala.

The project's international team also includes representatives from Kansas State University; North Carolina Agricultural and Technical State University; the Centro de Paz Bárbara Ford in Guatemala; Universidad Rafael Landívar in Guatemala; and the Panamerican Agricultural School, Zamorano, in Honduras.

“The learning shared between these three U.S. universities and the universities in Honduras and Guatemala will be enriching for all of the institutions involved,” said Manuel Reyes, research professor at Kansas State University who is part of the team. “I find it satisfying that these academic institutions will be investing intellectually in marginalized groups in Guatemala's Western Highlands — and in turn, learning from them too.”

Helping youth envision a future in agriculture

Miguel Isaias Sanchez has started farming with drip irrigation and a water tower, using information from one of the first MásRiego trainings. (Photo by Beth Mitcham)
The new MásRiego project will focus on helping farmers, particularly women and youth, grow high-value crops on very small plots of land (200 square meters minimum), in the Quiché, Quetzaltenango and Totonicapán departments of Guatemala's Western Highlands.

By partnering with local youth groups and agricultural schools, the team will better prepare students for jobs in commercial agriculture and agricultural extension with knowledge of climate-resilient conservation and water management practices.

“Our local team is training youth as entrepreneurs, to see agriculture as an economic opportunity instead of just back-breaking work,” said Meagan Terry, UC Davis junior specialist who is managing the project in Guatemala for the Horticulture Innovation Lab. “They can envision a future in agriculture, with innovative ways to create value-added products or grow high-value crops for niche markets.”

As rainfall patterns vary with climate change, farmers in this region are expected to face increased competition for water. Practices such as rainwater harvesting, drip irrigation and conservation agriculture will become more necessary for small-scale farmers.

Climate-smart lessons from conservation agriculture, drip irrigation

In previous research, the Horticulture Innovation Lab has found that combining drip irrigation with conservation agriculture practices can successfully grow vegetables on small plots of land, without significant yield reductions. These practices improve soil structure, moisture retention and soil health.

Additionally, women farmers who participated in the Horticulture Innovation Lab studies in Cambodia, Honduras and Guatemala favored using these practices for another important reason: reduced labor in relation to controlling weeds, vegetable bed preparation and manual watering.

“I dream for many women, youth and their families, that their lives will be better off because of 'MasRiego' and the science behind this work,” Reyes said. “As for the research, we are learning how to improve this suite of practices so they can be tailor fitted globally. I am convinced that if this picks up, steep sloping lands can be farmed with the soil quality not being degraded — but even being enriched.”

These lessons, as well as findings from the program's “Advancing Horticulture” report about horticultural sector growth in Central America, lay the foundation for this new project.

A previous version of this article was published by UC Davis News Service and on the Horticulture Innovation Lab blog

Curious about partnering with the Horticulture Innovation Lab? The Horticulture Innovation Lab builds partnerships between agricultural researchers in the United States and researchers in developing countries, to conduct fruit and vegetable research that improves livelihoods in developing countries. The program currently has three research grant opportunities for U.S. researchers: one focused on tomatoes, another on apricots, and a third on integrated crop-livestock systems. 

Posted on Tuesday, August 30, 2016 at 8:02 AM

Mark your calendar for World Food Day events

The day for collectively taking action against global hunger is still two months away. But September and October are already shaping up as “world food months,” with a number of events connecting Californians to their food systems and the world's food challenges.

World Food Day officially falls on October 16, honoring the establishment of the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO). In the meantime, here are a few worldly UC events to look out for, both online and in person:

UC Student Video Challenge calls for student stories

The World Food Center at UC Davis is kick-starting the World Food Day spirit of building awareness around solutions for ending hunger. In partnership with the UC ANR Nutrition Policy Institute and the UC Global Food Initiative, the Center launched a video contest for students across the 10 UC campuses—including extension offices and health systems—to capture stories on UC research related to food or nutrition security, as defined in the second of the UN's Sustainable Development Goals. Students can win up to $1,000 and a paid trip to the World Food Prize International Symposium. The deadline is September 7. 


World Bank and International Year of Pulses 

Combining World Food Day with the FAO's celebration of pulses for being a sustainable protein source, the agriculture and SecureNutrition groups at the World Bank are teaming up with the World Food Center to host a talk on the role of legumes in nutrition, climate-smart agriculture and serving low-income countries. Douglas Cook, director of the Chickpea Innovation Lab at UC Davis, will deliver the presentation, which will be streamed online as well, on October 6.

Talk from recent head of UN World Food Programme 

Speaking on the need for ensuring the world's neediest receive not only enough food, but the right food, World Prize laureate Catherine Bertini will deliver a public lecture in honor of World Food Day. The World Food Center is hosting Bertini at UC Davis on October 10, also with livestreaming available. The winning submissions for the World Food Day Video Challenge will be showcased ahead of the lecture.

barr kiko
(Photo: Karin Higgins/UC Davis)

UC research at World Food Prize 

Known as the “Borlaug Dialogue,” the World Food Prize International Symposium is the most prestigious gathering in food and agriculture. Beth Mitcham, head of the Horticulture Innovation Lab at UC Davis will speak at the symposium, while the World Food Center is again organizing a panel discussion, this time focused on measures of progress for nutrition security and featuring leaders from the FAO, the US Agency for International Development and the International Food Policy Research Institute.

In past years, World Food Prize laureates have included researchers from UC San Francisco, UC Berkeley and UC Davis. The symposium is held in Des Moines, Iowa, on October 12-14, and will be livestreamed as well.  

From “Tank” to “Fork” and everything in between 

While not directly connected to World Food Day, Sacramento's annual Farm-to-Fork celebrations have locals tipping their glasses to the close connection Californians share with the nation's top ag economy. Tastings, farm tours, food drives and street festivals span the month of September. The Farm Tank conference, meanwhile, is partnering with UC Davis and the Farm-to-Fork organizers to expand the foodie dialogue with a list of speakers ranging from corporate chefs to food reporters and UC ANR's chief information officer, Gabe Youtsey. The event also takes place in Sacramento, on September 22.

Posted on Monday, August 15, 2016 at 2:14 PM
  • Author: Brad Hooker

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